emergency

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170711-what-not-to-do-in-a-disaster?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits

“I’ll never forget the sound. The sound of metal crunching,” says George Larson, a passenger on Indian Airlines Flight 440 from Chennai (Madras) to New Delhi in 1973. It was 22:30 – pitch black outside. A storm was raging, and the plane was flying low. The rear end slammed into the ground first. Larson was thrown from… Continue reading http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170711-what-not-to-do-in-a-disaster?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits

emergency

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/antarctic-research-centre-towed-inland-to-avoid-ice-chasm-crack-growing-expanding-bas-british-survey-a7467211.html

Engineers are preparing to move an Antarctic research station because it is in the projected path of a crack expanding across the ice shelf. The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) base was built like a “very long railway train on skis”, allowing it to be moved with relative ease, but scientists did not expect to have… Continue reading http://www.independent.co.uk/news/antarctic-research-centre-towed-inland-to-avoid-ice-chasm-crack-growing-expanding-bas-british-survey-a7467211.html

emergency

http://www.wired.co.uk/article/edible-pouncer-drone-humanitarian-aid

Nigel Gifford makes drones with a difference. His humanitarian UAV, the Pouncer, is designed to deliver food aid in disaster zones – by being edible itself. That may sound unlikely, but Gifford, 70, has a history of succeeding with unconventional projects. He’s the Somerset-based engineer behind Aquila, the Wi-Fi-beaming drone bought by Facebook in 2014… Continue reading http://www.wired.co.uk/article/edible-pouncer-drone-humanitarian-aid

emergency

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/07/20/the-really-big-one

When the 2011 earthquake and tsunami struck Tohoku, Japan, Chris Goldfinger was two hundred miles away, in the city of Kashiwa, at an international meeting on seismology. As the shaking started, everyone in the room began to laugh. Earthquakes are common in Japan—that one was the third of the week—and the participants were, after all,… Continue reading http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/07/20/the-really-big-one